Tracking major abortion restrictions and protections throughout the United States

In April, two states approved bills banning abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, the latest acts as Republican-led states move quickly to restrict access to abortion. Kentucky’s ban, passed by the Republican-led Legislative Assembly over the Democratic governor’s veto, took effect immediately. The Florida governor this week signed a ban that is due to take effect in July.

While many of the bills this year are similar to bills we have seen before, the stakes are quite different. In recent years, the most restrictive bans have been blocked by the courts, convicted of unconstitutional because they violated the precedent of the Supreme Court established in Roe v. Wade, which has protected the constitutional right to abortion for almost 50 years.

[What abortion laws would look like if Roe v. Wade were overturned]

But six months after the Texas ban went into effect, the Supreme Court is considering a case that could overturn or weaken significantly RoeAnti-abortion legislators across the country are newcomers and are passing bills that could reshape the abortion landscape in the United States before the end of the summer.

April 19thProtection

A bill to protect the right to abortion in Connecticut passing the first chamber.

April 14Restriction

15 week ban in Florida is signed into law. It is set to take effect in July. Read more ”

April 13Restriction

15 week ban in Kentucky enters into force. Read more ”

April 9Protection

A bill to protect the right to abortion in Maryland becomes law after the legislature has overruled the governor’s veto. It is set to take effect in July.

As Republican-led states move to limit abortion, and democratically-dominated states move to protect access to the procedure, here are the types of legislation we will follow most closely over the next few months:

15 week ban

New in force in a state

Passed but blocked by the courts two states

Recent action in three states

Legislators in several GOP-led states are proposing bills that reflect the Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban, the law that is at the heart of the case pending before the Supreme Court, in hopes of maximizing the chance their laws could take effect after the district court have settled this. summer.

[Chief Justice Roberts said Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban was ‘the standard’ around the world. The reality is more complicated.]

Republicans have described these bans as a sensible “compromise” compared to the more restrictive six-week ban in Texas. But a 15-week ban still represents a dramatic rollback of the standard set by Roewhich protects the right to abortion until a fetus is viable outside the womb, about 24 weeks.

states are considering 15 week ban

Kentucky Read more “ R R D

Take effect

Arizona

Listed to take effect in mid-July

R R R

Signed in law

Florida Read more “

Listed to take effect in July

R R R
West Virginia R R R

Passed a chamber

Texas-style ban

Previously adopted in a state

Passed but blocked by the courts a state

Recent action in 12 states

Anti-abortion lawmakers across the country saw a great opportunity in Texas’ restrictive six-week ban, which allows private citizens to enforce the law through civil litigation. Using this new legal strategy, Texas lawmakers found a way to circumvent the courts, which have previously stopped a dozen similar bans. Almost immediately after the Texas law came into force, Republican lawmakers in other states began expressing their intentions to try the same strategy.

[Texas’s strict new abortion law has eluded multiple court challenges. Abortion rights advocates think they have a new path to get it blocked.]

Six months later, more than a dozen states have proposed their own versions of the Texas abortion ban. Most of these laws prohibit abortion after six weeks of pregnancy before most people know they are pregnant and all use the Texas law enforcement mechanism.

One important thing to note: These laws may begin to take effect long before the Supreme Court’s ruling this summer. Unless Idaho’s law is blocked by the courts, it will take effect in mid-April.

states are considering a Texas-style ban

Idaho Read more “

Temporarily blocked by the courts

R R R

Blocked by the courts

Oklahoma R R R

Passed a chamber

Alabama R R R

Introduced

Arizona R R R
Arkansas R R R
Florida Read more “ R R R
Louisiana R R D
Maryland D D R
Minnesota D R D
Missouri Read more “ R R R
Ohio R R R
Tennessee R R R
Wisconsin R R D

Trigger ban

Previously adopted in 12 states, recently in force in a state

Recent action in six states*

* A state already has a trigger ban, but is considering a more complete ban.

Even before this year’s legislative sessions, 12 states already had “trigger laws” on the books. These are complete bans on abortion, at any point in the pregnancy that “triggers” as soon as Roe v. Wade is overturned.

[Twelve states have abortion ‘trigger laws.’ What are they?]

A particularly important version of this law is moving through the Oklahoma Legislature, which already has an ejection ban. Legislators propose to revise the existing trigger law, so even if Roe not completely overturned, a complete abortion ban would still come into force.

states are considering a restraining order

Wyoming R R R

Take effect

Oklahoma R R R

Passed a chamber

Indiana R R R

Introduced

Iowa R R R
Nebraska R * R
Ohio R R R
South Carolina R R R

* Nebraska’s legislature has only one chamber. It is technically impartial, but effectively controlled by Republicans.

Total ban on abortion pills

Recent action in eight states

Note: No state currently has a total ban on abortion pills. Texas and Indiana have existing partial bans on abortion pills after seven weeks and 10 weeks, respectively.

Medication abortion – an abortion method that involves taking two pills, mifepristone and misoprostol – now accounts for more than 50 percent of the abortions performed in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration lifted important restrictions on abortion pills in December, allowing abortion providers to ship pills by mail in states that do not already ban telemedicine for abortion treatment, a move that has prompted Republican lawmakers to crack down on drug abortions.

Republican lawmakers in several states have introduced bills that will ban drug abortions completely, while many more are pushing for measures that will ban personal visits for abortion pills. Other GOP lawmakers have proposed bills that would force abortion clinics to provide medically inaccurate “abortion reversal” information when administering abortion pills, and inform patients that they can reverse their abortions if they change their mind after taking the first one. pill, a regime that has been widely condemned by leading medical associations.

states are considering a total ban on abortion pills

South Dakota R R R

Passed a chamber

Wyoming R R R
Alabama R R R

Introduced

Arizona R R R
Illinois D D D
Iowa R R R
Missouri R R R
Washington D D D

Protection of the right to abortion

Previously adopted in 15 states and DC, recently in force in two states

Recent action in 15 states and DC*

* Eight states already have laws that protect the right to abortion, but are considering additional protection.

With Roe at risk, many democratically-led states are moving to pass laws protecting the right to abortion within their borders. While most of these states are trying to codify Roe in the state statute, more are on the way to anchoring the right to abortion in their state constitutions.

[What questions do you have about abortion legislation in the U.S.? Ask The Post.]

Other states are trying to create abortion “reserves” within their borders and are working to pass laws that will make it easier for people to travel to their clinics from anti-abortion states.

states are considering protection of the right to abortion

Colorado D D D

Take effect

New Jersey D D D
Washington

Listed to take effect in early July

D D D

Signed in law

Vermont Read more “

Through a constitutional amendment

D D R

Becomes ballot paper target

Maryland

Through law and a constitutional amendment. Listed to take effect in July.

D D R

Gov. veto overridden

Connecticut

Through law and a constitutional amendment

D D D

Passed a chamber

California D D D

Introduced

District of Columbia
Florida R R R
Illinois

Through a constitutional amendment

D D D
Kentucky R R D
Maine D D D
Michigan

Through law and a constitutional amendment

R R D
Minnesota D R D
Missouri R R R
New Hampshire

Through law and a constitutional amendment

R R R
Pennsylvania R R D
Wisconsin R R D
About this story

Sources: Post reporting; Elizabeth Nash, Principal Policy Associate for State Issues at the Guttmacher Institute; Planned Parenthood Federation of America; and the National Conference of State Legislators.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.